Greece

My Big Fat Greekish Family

14194464_1729848813946820_358420734_nThe air is breezy and warm on the balcony of Sayed and Nahid’s 6th floor apartment.  The top of a large plastic table is a mosaic of plates piled high with rice and meat and vegetable dishes, mostly Afghan. From the table, we can see the Acropolis — 17 of us perched on rickety chairs or lounging on a small sofa that looks like early Ikea.   Continue reading

Arson at Notara 26 Squat

IMG_0204 (1)This morning I walked up the street three blocks to see the damage at a squat called Notara 26. Last night it was set on fire with 120 people inside, among them, a large number of children.  When I arrived, residents and volunteers were throwing burned debris out of second story windows and hauling buckets of ashes to dumpsters. The bottom two floors are gutted.   Continue reading

Skaramangas

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Skaramangas is a harbor west of central Athens named after a wealthy English family. It is also a refugee camp at the harbor west of central Athens named after a wealthy English family.  Since April, Skaramangas Camp is what must pass for home for about 3,000 people from Syria, Afghanistan, and Iraq. It is considered to be one of the good camps.

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Love and Anarchy in Exarchia

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Sayed’s photos of Muhtasham and Mutahar showing off their temporary tattoos.

I am back in Athens, Greece. I have returned to write, to find ways to be useful in the refugee community and to spend time with my Afghan family.  So far, I am doing pretty well with one thing on my list. Sayed and Nahid and their children have enriched my life immeasurably, and they are making the most of the dramatic changes in their lives since they left Afghanistan.   Continue reading

Sayed

 

13062533_1678324572432578_4992098866604731861_nThis is the story of Sayed and his family, refugees from Afghanistan who arrived in Greece in February 2016.  I met Sayed while I was working in Greece as one of thousands of volunteers supporting refugees from the Middle East and Asia.  Sayed’s story suggests some of the hardships and risks millions of people are taking to escape war and persecution.  Sayed encouraged me to write this so others will understand a little about what people will endure to find safety and freedom.

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Magical Molyvos

DSCN0090The Greek word “philoxenia” is literally translated as “friend of strangers” but its essential meaning is “generosity of spirit.” I have experienced this Greek value every day in Molyvos for the past two months. In addition to having flowering pastures,  dramatic hillsides, sheep bells clanging through the valleys, amazing food and beautiful beaches, Molyvos is home to some of the most friendly, caring people I have ever met.

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My Special Birthday Guest, Pope Francis

 

popeMy hero, Pope Francis, came to Lesvos on my birthday. He was not visiting me personally, as you might guess, but his visit felt personal. He came because so many victims of war, oppression and persecution are not getting the benefit of global leadership that treats them according to Christian values. Or Jewish values. Or Muslim values. Or Hindu, Buddhist, Sufi, Shinto, B’hai, Crips and Bloods values.

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